Spring 2017: Help Us Help Others!: we provide research, analysis, and resources to help the missions community reach the unreached. If each reader donated just $10, we could meet our our operations budget through the summer. Will you be one who helps? Donate here.

There's a quote from Leonard Ravenhill I see from time to time: "Today we spend more money on dog food than missions."

Do you know the source of it, and the benchmark statistics? If so, please comment below - because I am not entirely sure this is true at this point.

In the US, the American Pet Products Association estimates we spend $23 billion on pet food. (On pets in total, for everything from vets to toys to food, we spent $60.5 billion in 2015).

Globally, we spend $48 billion on missions (CSGC figure). I suspect that the US, being the largest sender of missionaries, spends the greatest percentage of that amount.

So it doesn't look to me like we actually spend more on pet food than on missions. But, to consider this further: when you think about it, people who own dogs have to regularly buy dog food. It's rather like saying we spend more on bread or milk or eggs than on missions. It's hard to compare a staple to what is typically at most a once-a-year or once-a-month contribution.

A parallel statement might be: Today Christians spend more money on their mortgage than on their tithe. It sounds horrible when we put it that way - but it would be expected. Tithe is Biblically 10%, whereas most mortgages are about 20 to 30% or more.

UPDATE: A reader noted this estimate, that people spend more than $350 million on Halloween costumes for their pets. This is comparable (and used to exceed) to what we spend on missions to the unreached (variously estimated at 1% of missions spending, or ~$480 million).